11 Everyday Habits That Increase Blood Sugar Level Alarmingly

4. Eating a Heavy Dinner

The human body naturally has a better glucose tolerance in the morning as compared to the night. A recently conducted 8-day study reveals that the body’s natural clock, medically termed as the circadian rhythm, has a profound impact on our blood sugar levels. The researchers examine the eating patterns of 14 healthy participants after they were made to eat a meal at 8 in the morning, and another meal at 8 in the night.

The participants were examined on “normal days” when they consumed their first meal at 8am, and their last meal at 8pm before sleeping at night. Then, the participants were examined on days when their eating schedules were reversed, making them eat their first meal at 8pm and their last meal at 8am, making them sleep through the day.

The results revealed that the meals consumed at 8pm coincided with blood sugar levels, which were 17% greater than the levels measured after the meals consuming at 8am, regardless of if the meals were the same, and the sleeping schedule of the participants. The researchers revealed that it’s not just the items we consume, but also the timings when we consume that has a detrimental influence on our ability to manage our blood sugar levels.

Overeating at Dinner Spike Blood Sugar
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Pinterest

Credit Image: Thinkstock

This basically means that carbohydrates and other food items that increase blood sugar levels should be consumed for breakfast as opposed to dinner. The researchers also explained that the circadian rhythm has a significant impact on blood sugar, which reveals why shift workers with disturbing schedules tend to be at a greater risk to suffer from type 2 diabetes.

Another study conducted in 2014 also revealed similar results on the impact of dinners. Subjects who consumed a heavy breakfast of around 700 calories in the morning, and a mindful dinner of no more than 200 calories were able to effectively manage their blood sugar levels, as opposed to subjects who consumed a small breakfast of 200 calories and a large dinner of 700 calories.

It is important to note that blood sugar levels can also increase very early in the morning, during the period between 4am to 5am, which is known as dawn phenomenon. Patients suffering from type 2 diabetes can effectively manage this dawn phenomenon by consuming their dinner a bit earlier in the evening.

5. Menstruation

Menstruation is one of the prime causes of temporary mood swings and disturbed dietary habits amongst women, however, what many women don’t know is that their menstrual periods can also increase in their blood sugar levels. Menstruation causes fluctuations in the hormone levels present within the body, and while you are having your period, there is a possibility of a temporary insulin resistance to develop within your body, which can trigger an increase in your blood sugar levels.

Even though majority of the women experience blood sugar spikes in the days just before their period, however, many women also experience a reduction in blood sugar levels. Experts believe that women who are headed towards menopause are more likely to experience unpredictable blood sugar levels during menstruation.

Menstruation Spike Blood Sugar
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Pinterest

Credit Image: Thinkstock

If you feel that your menstrual period is influencing fluctuations in your blood sugar levels, you can always examine your blood sugar readings to identify a monthly pattern. This pattern will help you identify any changes in your blood sugar levels, and then, you can consult your doctor on a suitable treatment to treat blood sugar increases or drops during your period.

Add a Comment

Pin It on Pinterest

Share This