The Abdomen (Human Anatomy) – Function, Conditions, Tests & Treatments

The abdomen, also known as the belly, is the area between your chest and your pelvis. The upper surface of your abdomen is the diaphragm, and the abdomen ends at the level of the pelvic bones, right where the pelvis begins.

Your abdomen is home to all the digestive organs, such as the small and large intestines, stomach, gallbladder, spleen, pancreas kidneys and liver. The mesentery, a net of connecting tissues, hold all these organs together in a loose grip, allowing them to slide against each other and expand as required to aid the functioning of the body.

Where is your lower abdomen

Several of the key blood vessels make their way through your abdomen, amongst which the most important ones include vena cava, aorta and countless of their smaller branches that travel throughout the abdominal region. From the front, fascia, a thin yet sturdy layer of tissue, protects the abdomen, and the fascia itself is covered by the abdominal muscles and the skin. The spine and back muscles are located at the back of the abdomen.

Abdomen Conditions

1. Abdominal aortic aneurysm

It occurs when a weakness inside the walls of the aorta leads to abnormal growth over time, and eventually it causes the vessels to expand like a balloon. If the abdominal aortic aneurysms grown abnormally large they can burst and lead to a fatalistic emergency.

2. Abdominal distension

A medical term that refers to swelling inside the abdomen, and this is mostly caused when the intestinal gas increases abnormally.

3. Abdominal hernia

A hernia is a weakness or a gap within the abdominal fascia, which is causing a section of the intestine to bloat up and protrude.

Add a Comment

error: Content is protected !!