How to Stay Safe From Tick Bites

One of the Kentucky toddlers got the disease from a tick bite while playing in the park. Jackson Oblisk, the two-year-old boy of Kentucky, contracted a rare disease, Rocky Mountain spotted fever. This rare disease needs a lot of time to recover. Over the last 30 years, the rate of Tick-borne diseases has increased, said by the Dr. Brian Fallon of the Lyme and Tick-Borne Diseases Research Center.

Some people think that cities are safe from tick but this is not true. Dr. John Aucott told CBS News that streams and green belts, present in the cities are the habitats of ticks. Ticks are present everywhere unless you live in an unbelievable urban center where everything is concrete and asphalt.

There are several ways to keep yourself and your family safe this summer:

  • If a tick is attached to your skin, do not rub the area or squeeze it. It can release its toxins into the body. Be careful while removing the ticks from the skin.
  • Try to remove the ticks with the help of tweezers.
  • Do not walk in the brushy areas having high grass. Try to walk in the center of paths.
  • When you come home to check your body and clothes keenly. The disease rate is increased if the ticks are present for a long time on your body.
  • Take a bath when you come home as soon as possible.
  • Apply tick bites repellent on exposed skin, having 20% to 30% DEET in it.
  • Wear long sleeves, pants, and socks when you are out.
  • If you are not feeling well, go to the doctor.
  • Examine your pets too before holding.
Tick Bites Treatment and Prevention
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Credit: HealthZone

Health officials say, if you receive proper treatment in early stages, you will recover rapidly and completely.

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